Business Taxes, Family Taxes, General Information, General Tax Topics, Self Employed, signing agent, Small Business, Tax Debt, Tax Deductions, Tax Planning, Tax Reduction, Uncategorized

5 LAST MINUTE YEAR END TAX SAVINGS TRICKS TO INCREASE YOUR BUSINESS DEDUCTIONS

tax planning
In our South Loop of Chicago tax preparation office, we often have small business owners looking to reduce their taxable income. In the spirit of the holiday’s we’ve written this article for small business owners with the purpose of you the reader getting the IRS to owe you money.

Of course, the IRS is not likely to cut you a check for this money (although in the right circumstances, that will happen), but you’ll realize the cash when you pay less in taxes.

Here are five powerful business tax deduction strategies that you can easily understand and implement before the end of 2019.

1. Prepay Expenses Using the IRS Safe Harbor

You just have to thank the IRS for its tax-deduction safe harbors.

IRS regulations contain a safe-harbor rule that allows cash-basis taxpayers to prepay and deduct qualifying expenses up to 12 months in advance without challenge, adjustment, or change by the IRS.

Under this safe harbor, your 2019 prepayments cannot go into 2021. This makes sense, because you can prepay only 12 months of qualifying expenses under the safe-harbor rule.

For a cash-basis taxpayer, qualifying expenses include lease payments on business vehicles, rent payments on offices and machinery, and business and malpractice insurance premiums.

Example. You pay $3,000 a month in rent and would like a $36,000 deduction this year. So on Tuesday, December 31, 2019, you mail a rent check for $36,000 to cover all of your 2020 rent. Your landlord does not receive the payment in the mail until Thursday, January 2, 2020. Here are the results:

• You deduct $36,000 in 2019 (the year you paid the money).
• The landlord reports $36,000 in 2020 (the year he received the money).
Schedule-button-nbor click here to call us 1-855-743-5765.

You get what you want—the deduction this year. The landlord gets what he wants—next year’s entire rent in advance, eliminating any collection problems while keeping the rent taxable in the year he expects it to be taxable.

Don’t surprise your landlord: if he had received the $36,000 of rent paid in advance in 2019, he would have had to pay taxes on the rent money in tax year 2019.

2. Stop Billing Customers, Clients, and Patients

Here is one rock-solid, time-tested, easy strategy to reduce your taxable income for this year: stop billing your customers, clients, and patients until after December 31, 2019. (We assume here that you or your corporation is on a cash basis and operates on the calendar year.)
newsletter
Customers, clients, patients, and insurance companies generally don’t pay until billed. Not billing customers and patients is a time-tested tax-planning strategy that business owners have used successfully for years.

Example. Jim Schafback, a dentist, usually bills his patients and the insurance companies at the end of each week; however, in December, he sends no bills. Instead, he gathers up those bills and mails them the first week of January. Presto! He just postponed paying taxes on his December 2019 income by moving that income to 2020.

3. Buy Office Equipment

With bonus depreciation now at 100 percent along with increased limits for Section 179 expensing, buy your equipment or machinery and place it in service before December 31, and get a deduction for 100 percent of the cost in 2019.

Qualifying bonus depreciation and Section 179 purchases include new and used personal property such as machinery, equipment, computers, desks, chairs, and other furniture (and certain qualifying vehicles).

4. Use Your Credit Cards

If you are a single-member LLC or sole proprietor filing Schedule C for your business, the day you charge a purchase to your business or personal credit card is the day you deduct the expense. Therefore, as a Schedule C taxpayer, you should consider using your credit card for last-minute purchases of office supplies and other business necessities.
Schedule-button-nbor click here to call us 1-855-743-5765.
If you operate your business as a corporation, and if the corporation has a credit card in the corporate name, the same rule applies: the date of charge is the date of deduction for the corporation.

But if you operate your business as a corporation and you are the personal owner of the credit card, the corporation must reimburse you if you want the corporation to realize the tax deduction, and that happens on the date of reimbursement. Thus, submit your expense report and have your corporation make its reimbursements to you before midnight on December 31.
newsletter 

5. Don’t Assume You Are Taking Too Many Deductions

If your business deductions exceed your business income, you have a tax loss for the year. With a few modifications to the loss, tax law calls this a “net operating loss,” or NOL.

If you are just starting your business, you could very possibly have an NOL. You could have a loss year even with an ongoing, successful business.

You used to be able to carry back your NOL two years and get immediate tax refunds from prior years; however, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act eliminated this provision. Now, you can only carry your NOL forward, and it can only offset up to 80 percent of your taxable income in any one future year.

What does this all mean? You should never stop documenting your deductions, and you should always claim all your rightful deductions. We have spoken with far too many business owners, especially new owners, who don’t claim all their deductions when those deductions would produce a tax loss.

I trust that you found the five ideas above worthwhile. Although we’ve given you the basics, this is not an all-inclusive article. Should you have questions, or need business tax preparation, business entity creation, business insurance, or business compliance assistance please contact us online, or call our office at 855-743-5765. Make sure to join our newsletter for more tips on reducing taxes, and increasing your wealth.

Schedule-button-nb

Never miss another tip again! Join our newsletter, to receive tax reduction/wealth building tips delivered right to your inbox!

newsletter

Family Taxes, General Information, retirement planning, Self Employed, Uncategorized

12 Things you need to know about your parent.

senior

While I am focused on helping small businesses grow by reducing their taxes, and organizing their books, I firmly believe that health of body and mind leads to wealth. To help you be better prepared in the event of an emergency involving your parents/loved ones, below (in order of importance) is a list of 12 things you need to know about your aging parents’ health.  If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please don’t hesitate to call us!

WHAT ARE THE NAMES OF THEIR DOCTOR’S & SPECIALIST? If you don’t know anything else, this is probably the most important piece of information. Why? Chances are good that your parents’ doctors can provide much of the rest of the information needed as well as more details about your parents’ specific health histories.

Do they have any major medical problems? This includes such conditions as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, etc.

What Medications are they on? Have a list of medications and supplements. It’s especially important that a doctor know if your parent uses blood thinners. It’s also important for your doctor to know if your parents take any vitamin or herbal supplements (as these might interact with medications given in an emergency situation.

What is their previous medical history? Have they had any surgeries and major medical procedures? List past medical procedures including implanted medical devices such as pacemakers.

What is their insurance information? Know the name of your parents’ health insurance provider and their policy numbers.

What Are their End-of-Life Wishes? For instance: Would you want a ventilator and feeding tube used to keep you alive even in an irreversible coma? Do you want CPR initiated if your heart stops, even if you are terminally ill? Make sure the health care proxy is aware of your parent’s decisions.

Do they have any ADVANCE DIRECTIVES? An advance directive (living will, Do Not Resuscitate aka DNR, etc) is a legal document that outlines a person’s decisions about his or her health care, such as whether or not resuscitation efforts should be made and the use of life-support machines.

Have they named a durable power of attorney to manage their finances, or healthcare?
The first step is to find out if they have named a Durable Power of Attorney (POA). Without a POA in place, you’ll have to go to court to get guardianship of your parent in order to access accounts on their behalf.

Where do they keep their financial records and important documents?
Whether they keep their money and documents in a bank, a safe, or under the mattress, you need to know where to find records when you need them. What is the location of keys or codes to lock boxes or safes?

What are their bank account numbers and names of their financial institutions?
In addition to knowing where they keep their money, you need specifics on all account numbers. What banks do they use? Who is their mortgage company? Do they have an investment firm?

What are your parent’s monthly expenses?
Gather information on their mortgage, car payment, credit card debt, electric bill and other expenses.

How do they pay their bills currently, ESPECIALLY THEIR LIFE INSURANCE!!
If there are automatic deductions being taken out of a checking account, you need to know about it. Do they use online banking, or are they mailing in paper checks? DO NOT ASSUME!

This list was provided to us by our partner nonprofit agency  Senior Resource Group Inc. The mission of Senior Resource Group Inc.

is to remove access barriers to service, empower seniors through education, lower prescription drug cost, consolidate resources, and mobilize assistance.

Senior Resource Group Inc. services range from locating no cost insulin for diabetics; applying clients for prescription drug grants; locating local/state/federal and private assistance programs; explaining Medicare; and identifying the lowest cost Medicare supplements, health plans, & insurance solutions. Each of our clients are given an extensive individual interview so that our advocates can uncover every transportation, tax, food, and medical discounts he/she may qualify for.